Sorry, but we all hate spam bots

Haven't registered Yet? Register Now.

X

Login

Forgot Password

Already a user? Login

X

Register On DiveAdvisor

i

Much like a facebook page - you need to first have a personal account through which you can login and manage the business page.

After creating a personal account, you will be directed to 'My Dive Shop' section where you can claim existing listing or create a new one.

Got It
i
i
By Using this Site I agree to the Terms & Conditons
Or Register With:
X

Hey there,

hopefully you are sufficiently intrigued with DiveAdvisor to become a member and see it in action


Much like a facebook page - you need to first have a personal account through which you can login and manage the business page.

After creating a personal account, you will be directed to 'My Dive Shop' section where you can claim existing listing or create a new one.

Got It


Or Register With:
By Using this Site I agree to the Terms & Conditons

Canada flag Scuba Diving Canada




434 Dive Sites 147 Dive Shops 9 Dive Logs

Part 1: Overview of Scuba Diving in Canada

It has the largest land area and the longest coastline in the world, and it’s a haven for sports enthusiasts of all disciplines. High rocky mountains, low valleys, and deeps lakes make it the perfect recreational playground, and when it comes to scuba diving in Canada, the choice is endless.

 

Canada is a vast landscape, covering many thousands of miles, and despite its diverse conditions and climate, and large number of lakes, the majority of its dive sites are located in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans to the east and west of the country. It has a reputation for some great wreck dives, as well as some interesting cold water sites. If freshwater exploration is needed, there are one or two inland locations that are well used.

 

Scuba diving in Canada is not as simple as it tends to be in tropical climates or equatorial countries. Although its waters can be very clear, strong currents can significantly reduce your visibility, and bearing in mind its proximity to the north pole, diving in some parts requires specialist training and equipment simply to beat the cold.

 

The waters off the west coast near the province of British Columbia are a diver’s dream for its diversity of marine life. Large squid and octopi, orcas and dolphins, wolf eels and corals live here in abundance. Head to the east coast and the cold salt waters off Newfoundland are brimming with military vessels, sunk back in the Second World War. Meanwhile the Great Lakes in Ontario are full of ancient wooden ships from the 1800’s, almost perfectly preserved thanks to the lack of salt in their environment. 

 

The best months for scuba diving in Canada are from April to October, regardless of which site you choose. Visibility during the winter months can be excellent, and spring brings with it new life and migration of marine animals. But bear in mind that these months can be particularly cold, rarely, if ever, reaching above 13°C in the water. 

Part 2: Dive Sites, Marine Life & Environment in Canada

Scuba diving in Canada is undoubtedly a popular pastime, and with such great access to the water, it’s little wonder that it ranks so highly on the list of sporting activities. Its large number of dive sites means that deciding where to dive is usually the greatest problem, but starting with east or west is the best idea – the country is simply too big to travel from one side to the other in a hurry.

 

British Columbia in the west is Canada’s outdoor capital. Although it's famous for skiing, hiking, snowboarding, and mountain biking, it’s also popular for water-based activities, particularly around the region of Vancouver Island. It also won the award for being the Best Overall Dive Destination in North America in 2011.  One favourite dive site is Race Rocks, a collection of small rocky islands to the very south of Vancouver Island topped off with an undersized lighthouse. Part of an ecological reserve, the dive site operates a strict ‘no-touch’ rule to preserve its integrity. The site is regularly visited by orcas, California sea lions, and Alaskan fur seals. Plus, a large colony of harbour seals have made this site home.

 

Just north of Toronto in Ontario, the Five Fathoms National Park is a collection of islands sitting between Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. This freshwater location is filled with dives sites, including wall dives, caves, grottos and numerous wrecks, all jammed into one tiny preservation area. One of the most popular here is the Wetmore Steamer, built in 1971 and wrecked in 1901, lying in a maximum of 30m of water. Still in excellent condition, it’s a suitable dive for beginners and experienced divers.

 

Around Newfoundland and Labrador, the estimated number of shipwrecks has passed 8,000 in total. Some fell victim to the rocky landscape, while others were victims of the Second World War.  Just off the mainland, Bell Island is the site of several shipwrecks which from WWII, all preserved in excellent condition and a popular location for experienced divers. Diving here is subject to some difficult conditions, including strong currents and the occasional passing iceberg, but the opportunity to swim alongside sperm whales is worth the effort.

Part 3: Dive Shops, Airports & Logistics of Diving in Canada

For visitors and residents in Canada, finding a scuba shop is far from difficult, although the majority are located in the most southerly parts of the country, close to the border with the USA. Opportunities for diving here are plentiful, whereas the colder northern provinces attract very few divers.

 

Out Vancouver way, the Edge Diving Center is a 5 Star PADI outfit open every day of the year. As well as the usual courses and trips, they offer an excellent range of equipment, making them the perfect one-stop shop in for scuba divers in British Columbia. As well as diving in the local area, they also run trips abroad for like-minded water enthusiasts, and every Sunday they have an open dive day where anyone is welcome to meet at their dive centre, choose a buddy, and sort out car pooling. It’s the sort of laid-back, friendly atmosphere that diving is synonymous with.

 

Divers Den on Tobermory, right on the edge of the Five Fathoms National Park in Lake Huron, offers an outstanding selection of trips and dives to each of the many wrecks in this fabulous freshwater location. Offering PADI courses and boat charters throughout the year, they’re one of the few inland dive shops serving divers in Canada.

 

Out east, the Ocean Quest Dive School is located on St Johns, Newfoundland, the furthest point east in Canada. This dive school has a monopoly on business this far out, but that doesn’t mean its standards have slipped. In fact, it offers a comprehensive service for divers, including wreck diving at the sunken WWII vessels to the north, and snorkelling with sperm whales. Take a trip on a sea kayak to explore sunken mines and hidden caves, or ride on a rib to the icebergs for a close up look at these natural ice formations in person.

Flying in and out of Canada is the best way of getting around just due to the sheer size of the country, but there are plenty of airports serving customers with both domestic and international flights. Another way to travel is cross country by train, but if it's a coast to coast journey, the trip can take several days and is often very expensive.

Liveaboards in Canada

---- Book Your Diving ----

Fill in the Form Below.

Our hand picked regional partners will deliver no obligation quotes.

Please enter your name Please enter your email
Please select best option
Sending...






Certifications Offered

View All

Dive Types & Activities